Mortgage fees and costs

Taking out a mortgage can prove very costly. In addition to making regular mortgage payments, there are a number of other mortgage and property-related fees, such as a mortgage arrangement fee, stamp duty and solicitor fees that you may have to pay and therefore need to budget for.

Some of the fees, which are explained in detail below, can often be rolled into the mortgage, with the costs added to your monthly payments. This practice is called rolling up the fees. However, choosing this option will mean paying more in the long run due to the added interest, as well as higher monthly repayments.

Mortgage fees & charges

Mortgage booking fee/arrangement fee

This is the main fee that lenders charge to secure the mortgage funds and set up your home loan. Also known as the product fee, it is normally payable upon completion but can often be added to the loan. Fees vary from lender to lender but are typically around £500.

Broker fee

Mortgage brokers usually charge a fee for arranging the mortgage or providing advice. However, they must inform you of this and the amount they charge in the Keyfacts 'about our mortgage services' document.

Valuation fee

The valuation fee is what the lender charges to carry out a valuation of your property so that it can. Because the mortgage is secured against your home, the lender needs to assess whether your property is worth at least the money it is lending you. The size of the fee depends on the value of the property and also the lender.

Re-inspection fee

Your property may need to be re-inspected, after the original valuation, to check if you've made agreed repairs. To cover its costs the lender charges a fee, which is usually between £50 and £100.

Higher lending charge

Some lenders charge a fee for those who wish to borrow more than 75 per cent of the value of the property. This is known as a Higher Lending Charge and is used to provide you with insurance that protects the lender in the event that you are unable to repay your loan and they have to sell your house at a loss. The size of the HLC depends on the amount you borrow and how much you put down as a deposit.

CHAPS fee

The CHAPS (Clearing House Automated Payment System) fee, also known as a telegraphic transfer fee, covers the lender's administration costs of transferring the mortgage funds to your solicitor. Most lenders charge around £40-£50, although some charge a lot less.

Insurance penalty

If you decide you don't want to take out buildings insurance cover with your mortgage lender, you may be charged a fee (typically £25) for making your own buildings insurance arrangements.

Early repayment charge

If you repay all or part of your mortgage earlier than the agreed term you may have to pay a fee known as an Early Repayment Charge (ERC). This usually applies to fixed and discounted variable rate mortgages, and is often calculated as a percentage of the outstanding loan. Your Keyfacts about this mortgage document will have full details on when an ERC applies.

Exit administration fee

This is a fee levied by the lender when you redeem your mortgage, either because you have finished repaying it or because you want to switch to another lender. Exit fees range from anywhere between £75 and £300, but can be higher if any early repayment charge if applicable.

Note; All the mortgage-related costs will be listed and clearly explained in the Key Facts about this mortgage document (also known as a Keyfacts illustration or KFI).

Moving costs

Stamp Duty Land Tax

Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT) is a form of tax that is paid to the government when you buy a home. The cost of this tax varies depending on the purchase price of the property. If the purchase price is more than £125,000, you pay between 1 and 5% of that total. If the purchase price is £125,000 or less you don't pay any SDLT. If you are a first-time buyer you only have to pay SDLT on properties that worth £250,000 or more.

The SDLT payment is usually handled by your solicitor or licensed conveyancer who sends it to HMRC on your behalf.

Estate agency fee

This is a fee that estate agents charge for marketing and selling homes. The cost of their services is typically 1-3% of the property selling price.

Legal fees

These are the costs associated with the legal process of buying and selling a property (conveyancing). Your lender will appoint a conveyancing solicitor or licensed conveyancer to take care of all legal aspects of moving house, which include local authority and land charges searches, Land Registry and Stamp Duty. The fees charged by solicitors/licensed conveyancers vary but are typically around £500.

Survey fee

While your lender will carry out a valuation of your new property, this is only a very basic inspection. If you want a more detailed report on the property's condition, you can pay for a Homebuyers report or a structural survey to be carried out. The survey fee will depend on the surveyor, the size of property and the type of report you need.

Removal costs

When moving home, you may need the services of a removal company to help take your belongings from your old home to your new one. The fees charged vary depending on the company and how much of your stuff needs to be moved.

Mortgage-related Insurance

When taking out a mortgage, your lender or adviser may offer you a range of insurance policies. Some of these are compulsory alongside mortgages such as buildings insurance, whilst others are optional and depend on your circumstances. You may find that mortgage payment protection insurance (PPI) is a condition of your loan but it is important to remember that you don't have to buy this cover from your lender. In most cases, you will be able to find better deal by shopping around and comparing quotes.

Tips

  • Check your Keyfacts about this mortgage document for full details on all the fees you are required to pay.
  • Try to avoid adding fees to the mortgage as this will increase the cost of your loan in the long run.
  • Watch out for the hidden charges behind the cheap headline rate.
  • Shop around for insurance deals. Don't fell pressured into taking out cover that your lender offers.